Recipe: White Bean Basil Hummus

t’s hard to become bored with hummus, but every once in awhile I like to put a fun twist on the original recipe. White beans are not only lighter and smoother than chickpeas, but they have a very high concentration of the compound molybdenum, which can help improve gastro-intestinal health, and are packed with antioxidants that can help fight premature aging (among other things) [1]. The addition of basil brings a lightness to the dish — and a delicious aroma.

Recipe: White Bean Basil Hummus | Greatist.

Breeding the Nutrition Out of Our Food

WE like the idea that food can be the answer to our ills, that if we eat nutritious foods we won’t need medicine or supplements. We have valued this notion for a long, long time. The Greek physician Hippocrates proclaimed nearly 2,500 years ago: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Today, medical experts concur. If we heap our plates with fresh fruits and vegetables, they tell us, we will come closer to optimum health.

Breeding the Nutrition Out of Our Food – NYTimes.com.

Why Crohn’s Disease Patients Should Consider Vitamin D Supplements

Tara Raftery from University Dublin, Trinity College is here at Digestive Disease Week 2013 discussing her study, “Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Muscle Strength, Fatigue and Quality of Life in Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission: Results of a Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.”

Why Crohn's Disease Patients Should Consider Vitamin D Supplements – YouTube.

GERD Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Quiz

One of the most common maladies of the esophagus is gastroesophageal reflux. In 20% of the population, this is usually manifested as heartburn or regurgitation. A smaller percentage of patients will have symptoms of chest pain, cough or hoarseness. The diaphragm and the lower esophageal spincter (LES) act as barriers to prevent stomach acid from coming up into the esophagus (reflux). A hiatal hernia occurs when the opening of the diaphragm is too large and the top of the stomach can slide up and down into the chest. When this happens, the esophagus cannot strip the acid well and the effect of the diaphragm in preventing reflux is lost. Hiatal hernias may be seen on X-rays or during an upper endoscopy in patients who have no symptoms.
In many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the LES will relax at inappropriate times; in others, the LES pressure may be too low to prevent the reflux of stomach contents.

GERD Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Quiz on MedicineNet.

Decontaminating patients cuts hospital infections

Tara Raftery from University Dublin, Trinity College is here at Digestive Disease Week 2013 discussing her study, “Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Muscle Strength, Fatigue and Quality of Life in Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission: Results of a Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.”

Infections in U.S. hospitals kill tens of thousands of people each year, and many institutions fight back by screening new patients to see if they carry a dangerous germ, and isolating those who do. But a big study suggests a far more effective approach: Decontaminating every patient in intensive care.

Decontaminating patients cuts hospital infections.

More Java = Lower Risk of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

Craig Lammert, MD, discusses his study, “Coffee Consumption Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis but Not Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.” Dr. Lammert and colleagues presented this data at Digestive Disease Week 2013 in Orlando, FL.

More Java = Lower Risk of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis – YouTube.

Deadly ‘Super Bug’ Controlled in Large Study of Hospitals

WEDNESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) — Providing antibacterial soap and ointment to all patients in intensive-care units helps control the potentially deadly hospital-acquired infection known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus — or MRSA, a new U.S. government-funded study finds.

"This study helps answer a long-standing debate in the medical field about whether we should tailor our efforts to prevent infection to specific pathogens, such as MRSA, or whether we should identify a high-risk patient group and give them all special treatment to prevent infection," said study author Dr. Susan Huang, an associate professor at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine.

via Deadly 'Super Bug' Controlled in Large Study of Hospitals – MedicineNet.

Women’s Weight-Loss Surgery May Benefit Later Offspring

Researchers found differences in the activity of genes in children born to women after they’d had gastric bypass surgery compared to their siblings born before surgery. The changes suggest that the kids born after surgery, to thinner mothers, will fare better in terms of heart health because of benefits gained in the womb.

"It appears that there’s an effect that is transmitted to the next generation," said study co-author Marie-Claude Vohl, a professor at Laval University in Quebec City. "This may have some consequence later in life for the health of the children."

via Women's Weight-Loss Surgery May Benefit Later Offspring – MedicineNet.

Type II Diabetes among overweight Americans is increasing at alarming rates. Statistics indicate that more people are beginning to suffer from hypertension as a result of being obese. Researchers are also now studying the link between obesity and several types of cancer, resulting in an estimated 100,000 cancer deaths annually. For more information on weight-loss surgery visit our bariatric site here.

Delaying Colonoscopy Puts Man in Grave Danger

By Serena Gordon

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) — Like most people, Wisconsin resident Bruce Winkler dreaded the thought of having a colonoscopy.

He figured that because it’s recommended that people get their first colonoscopy at age 50, he could easily put off the procedure for a few years. "No one was pushing me into it, and I was perfectly healthy, or so I thought," Winkler said.

At his physical the year he turned 51, his doctor chided him and told him he should schedule a colonoscopy. Maybe after his next checkup, Winkler responded.

via Delaying Colonoscopy Puts Man in Grave Danger – MedicineNet.

Google Brings Nutrition Information to Search

Everyone knows that making healthy food choices and sticking to a diet isn’t always easy. But Google wants to make the process a little less intimidating.
The Web giant today announced plans to add nutritional information for more than 1,000 fruits, vegetables, meats, and meals directly into search. This means that when you Google something like “how much protein is in a banana?” or “how many calories are in an avocado?” you’ll get the answers right away, without having to click through to any of the actual search results, Google product manager Ilya Mezheritsky, wrote in a blog post.
Google added nutrition information for a range of food queries spanning “basics of potatoes and carrots to more complex dishes like burritos and chow mein,” Mezheritsky, said. For instance, if you’re at the movies and want to know how that popcorn is going to affect your diet, you can Google “how many calories are in popcorn” and quickly find out that it’s got 31 calories per cup.

Google Brings Nutrition Information to Search | News & Opinion | PCMag.com.

Eat Right for Healthier Sight

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these foods that can help promote healthier eyes:

Nutrient-rich kale, which can help protect against sunlight damage, cataracts and macular degeneration.

Sweet potatoes, which are rich in beta carotene and may help thwart macular degeneration.

Strawberries, which are rich in vitamin C and may help reduce the risk of cataracts.

Omega-3 fatty acid-rich salmon, which can help manage dry eyes and reduce the risk of macular degeneration.

Green tea, which is loaded with antioxidants and may help protect against macular degeneration and cataracts.

— Diana Kohnle

via Health Tip: Eat Right for Healthier Sight – MedicineNet.

Photo credit: Plutor / Foter.com / CC BY

New China Bird Flu May Be Resistant to Tamiflu – MedicineNet

Chinese scientists say they’ve identified the first cases of resistance to the flu drug Tamiflu in a person infected with the emerging H7N9 avian flu virus.

According to BBC News, there have been 131 confirmed cases in China of the new “bird” flu in humans so far, including 36 deaths. No new cases have been identified in over two weeks.

New China Bird Flu May Be Resistant to Tamiflu – MedicineNet.

Photo credit: Dani_vr / Foter.com / CC BY-SA